Trout Fishing in America

By Richard Brautigan A review on the back of this book used the term “mayonnaise” to describe Trout Fishing in America – and they were exactly right. Reading it was like eating a sandwich with an odd amount of mayo. Sometimes there was too little and it felt dry, sometimes too much and it felt creepy to eat, sometimes there was the perfect amount and … Continue reading Trout Fishing in America

Madoka Magica

If Yuki Yuna is an attempt at introducing cosmic horror, agency, and the personal consequences of power usage, then Madoka is the end all be all of magical girl deconstruction. It’s pastel, adorable, friendship centered, and absolutely horrifying, in the best way. Whether you watch the original series or the two recap films, the series is both beautiful and fascinating to watch unfold. Both series … Continue reading Madoka Magica

Yuki Yuna is a Hero

I was recommended this series on the grounds of both body horror and magical girls – which I love individually, but combined? Even better. With this specific combo in mind, I was a little disappointed. The magical girl aspect isn’t lacking: with flower themed battle suits and sparkling transformation sequences, Yuki Yuna more than delivered the pastel cuteness requisite of the genre. The cosmic horror … Continue reading Yuki Yuna is a Hero

Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

By Susanna Clarke Weighing in at over 780 pages, Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is a hefty, plot dense book that will tide you over for days. Despite its remarkably few characters for such a long work, it manages to entertain and reason with the most patient readers. Following the traditions of a comedy of manners as well as a historical novel, the book uses … Continue reading Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

Tsuritama

Fishing Ball, usually just called Tsuritama, is a beautifully animated slice of life series that follows the adventures of a young boy with social anxiety and chronicles him learning to fish. It sounds simple and slightly boring on the surface, but the visual presentation of the main character being overwhelmed in social situations by drowning while no one notices is an incredible enough detail for … Continue reading Tsuritama

Homestuck

By Andrew Hussie While the internet fanbase has become something of legend, the series itself transcends this stigma. As a literature major and analysis nerd, this series interests me as an amalgamation of allusions, homages, mythological retellings, and an odd amount of psychoanalysis, all to be noticed casually or examined in detail. At over 8, 124 pages of content, including text, graphics, videos, and gameplay, … Continue reading Homestuck

ASL Shakespeare

ASL Shakespeare, The American Sign Language Shakespeare Project. Website. Berson, Jessica. “Performing Deaf Identity: Toward a Continuum of Deaf Performance.” Bodies in Commotion: Disability and Performance, edited by Carrie Sandahl and Philip Auslander, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, 2005, pp. 42–55. Bradford, Shannon. “The National Theatre of the Deaf: Artistic Freedom and Cultural Responsibility in the Use of American Sign Language.” Bodies in Commotion: … Continue reading ASL Shakespeare

The Ring Companion

Meikle, Denis. The Ring Companion. Titan Books, 2005. For my resources on Ring and The Ring: click here, or here for my Ring novel review. While this a definitive resource on the facts surrounding the various Ring films – of which many are included and examined in this book – the author’s tone is remarkably pretentious. He introduces his research by stating that his book … Continue reading The Ring Companion

Magic, Witchcraft, and Paganism in America

Melton, J. Gordon. Magic, Witchcraft, and Paganism in America: a Bibliography. Vol. 1. Garland Publishing, INC: New York, 1982. This 212 page book is an incredibly concise and thorough resource for its title subjects. Having been published in 1982, its more than a little outdated, but if general historical eras or certain dates are what’s needed, this book delivers. It covers an eclectic selection ranging from … Continue reading Magic, Witchcraft, and Paganism in America

Bakemonogatari

Sometimes visuals are more important than plot. The Bakemonogatari series follows a simple supernatural harem story: the major catches of the series are the stunning visuals and unique, fluid animations with beautifully detailed urban backgrounds in a silent, empty world – and the in media res beginning and surreal, nonlinear order that the series order follows. There are two ways to watch the series: the chronological order … Continue reading Bakemonogatari