The Graveyard Book

Neil Gaiman The was a hand in the darkness and it held a knife. Without having read the book in several years, I can still recall the iconic opening line perfectly. Gaiman is a talented writer, and this book shows it well; from the masterful opening line to the clever and effective illustrations interspersed throughout. Even with such a violent opening and with death as … Continue reading The Graveyard Book

Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

By Susanna Clarke Weighing in at over 780 pages, Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell is a hefty, plot dense book that will tide you over for days. Despite its remarkably few characters for such a long work, it manages to entertain and reason with the most patient readers. Following the traditions of a comedy of manners as well as a historical novel, the book uses … Continue reading Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

Tsuritama

Fishing Ball, usually just called Tsuritama, is a beautifully animated slice of life series that follows the adventures of a young boy with social anxiety and chronicles him learning to fish. It sounds simple and slightly boring on the surface, but the visual presentation of the main character being overwhelmed in social situations by drowning while no one notices is an incredible enough detail for … Continue reading Tsuritama

Bakemonogatari

Sometimes visuals are more important than plot. The Bakemonogatari series follows a simple supernatural harem story: the major catches of the series are the stunning visuals and unique, fluid animations with beautifully detailed urban backgrounds in a silent, empty world – and the in media res beginning and surreal, nonlinear order that the series order follows. There are two ways to watch the series: the chronological order … Continue reading Bakemonogatari

DND: The History

BUDRA, PAUL. “Roll a D20 and the Author Dies.” From Text to Txting: New Media in the Classroom, edited by Paul Budra and Clint Burnham, Indiana University Press, 2012, pp. 1–14, http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt16gzhpg.5. Copier, Marinka. “Challenging the Magic Circle: How Online Role-Playing Games Are Negotiated by Everyday Life.” Digital Material: Tracing New Media in Everyday Life and Technology, edited by Marianne Van den Boomen et al., … Continue reading DND: The History

Sandman

By Niel Gaiman Gaiman is a familiar author from such popular titles as The Graveyard Book, Coraline, American Gods, and Good Omens. Gaiman kneaded in the horror, fantasy, and humor of his written works, rolled it in a crust of stars and baked it in a mythological oven for a millennia to produce The Sandman. The embodiment of Dreams is the protagonist, along with his sister Death and their … Continue reading Sandman

Hellsing

By Kouta Hirano Much like how Tolkien’s Ents were spawned from Great Birnam Wood’s failure to actually come to life in order to defeat Macbeth, Hellsing arose from the cursed ashes of Dracula’s death. Hellsing creates an alternate ending for Dracula in which Abraham Van Helsing uses his knowledge of monster hunting and the powerful tomes he has captured from witches over the years to … Continue reading Hellsing

Revolutionary Girl Utena

By Chiho Saito There is something both epically heroic and tragically Shakespearian about this series. A valorous knight fighting to save a trapped princess is a tale as old as time, and modernizations of such a familiar plot are abundant, especially as romances. Utena is one such series. It features a helpless princess trapped in poor circumstances and kept under guard by a band of … Continue reading Revolutionary Girl Utena